Humble ISD School Board, Position 3

Advocacy

GROWTH

As the largest body of elected officials in the state, school board members can be extremely powerful advocates. As such, school board members have a responsibility to learn about legislative issues and ensure that state and federal lawmakers know where our district stands on issues affecting our public schools.  Some of the biggest issues in the 85th legislative session affecting Humble ISD are:

  • Adequate and Equitable Funding
  • Vouchers, Taxpayer Savings Grants, Virtual Vouchers
  • Assessment & Accountability

Alignment

Humble ISD is listed among the 10 fastest growing school districts in Texas. As such,  we have very unique and specific needs related to building new facilities, hiring new staff and managing increased academic resource costs. Data is gathered through demographic studies that show enrollment trends, as well as through facility and usage studies that ascertain the condition and usage of existing buildings. This data will be used for future construction projects, facility planning and bond referendums.  Current projections show that we will grow by 13,500 students over the next 8-10 years, requiring three more elementary schools (#’s 28, 29, and 30), two more middle schools (#’s 9 and 10) and possibly a new high school (#7). Through the conservative fiscal management of our Board, the remaining $155 million in unsold bonds from the community’s support of bond 2008 were used exclusively to accommodate student growth by purchasing all of the land parcels needed to support the six new campuses, and hopefully, also fund the construction of Groves Elementary 28, Elementary 29, and Middle School 9.

Perhaps the most exciting work of the board in the next year will be utilizing the "Portrait of a Graduate" (list of the knowledge and skills our students will need for success in college, career and life in the 21st century) to develop strong vision and mission statements that reflect a common understanding of community expectations for students’ educational experiences. Having clearly defined the vision and mission of the organization, administration then can set strategic objectives that are aligned with the district's long-term goals. Administrators translate these strategic objectives into an operational strategy that can be implemented, monitored and evaluated.